Mesh Medical Device News Desk, August 17, 2019 ~ Monique Sanders is a prolapse expert who turned to natural remedies to resolve her own problems. She advises others on what to ask a doctor if he says you need surgery, whether with mesh or not. 

Image: Monique Sanders,  Prolapse Natural Healing & Therapeutic Massage

Monique Sanders is an Albuquerque-based natural healer who founded Prolapse Natural Healing & Therapeutic Massage. She suffered terribly with prolapse and incontinence until she sought her own solutions and has become a Whole Woman practitioner.

She attended the 2019 Whole Woman Conference in Albuquerque, New Mexico, August 9-11.  She demonstrated  manual lymphatic drainage, and the correct Whole Woman breath, as well as standing.

Her goal is to help women develop a positive mindset, a comfortable acceptance of prolapse symptoms, alongside a specific goal of restoring natural posture to the whole body using therapeutic massage techniques and exercise.

Lymphatic drainage

Mesh News Desk asked Sanders about the questions to ask your doctor if he suggests pelvic repair.

Sanders says:

“ If your doctor suggests pelvic repair, typically ask if you can have the informed consent letter for surgery.  If yes, ask to read the disclaimer. Ask if there is any handwritten comment by the doctor. Those are the details that are part of surgery written down for legal reasons. They have to state this.

“It is a seven page document usually. Look at the disclaimer and the handwritten comments. Look for the generic parachute statement that provides no assurance that your condition will be taken care of.

“I ask my clients if they have sat with the doctor and ask what organs may be damaged during surgery. The disclaimer will state that. I make that connection.

“Are you willing to ask the doctor what the damage and morbidity (death) potential will be if my bladder is damaged?

Whole Woman breathing sitting

“What is the damage potential and morbidity rate if my colon is damaged?

“I ask for him to write this down and do the same for the uterus and cervix.

“I ask the client to ask the doctor to please identify what region of the pelvic floor will be cut and altered during surgery and identify those regions specifically.  They have the inside of the cervix mapped out with a number grid (they do this for ablations). I know it exists.

“I reframe their question and ask how this is making them feel.  Do you require someone to sit with you as a patient advocate?

“Clients usually get scared. I have watched Whole Woman work and the results are a better relationships with their husband and healthier women when they understand they will not die from prolapse. They end up calmer.”